Social Services – Vignette

Angela’s Story

Angela, a military spouse, was denied food stamps. Her family income was over the threshold, yet she struggled with making ends meet. Even with her husband’s deployment income being a little higher than his civilian paycheck, she was spending more on childcare and home maintenance because he was overseas.

She had bought a lot of presents for Christmas because she wanted the kids to have a great holiday, especially with their dad deployed. Her credit card payments were higher than ever. The Welfare rep advised that she seek financial counseling and explore a debt management program through a local non-profit.  Angela took the advice and met with a non-profit financial education center.

They reviewed her credit card bills, other monthly expenses, and sources of income, but were having trouble establishing a clear budget that would balance each month while also paying down the mounting debt.

When Angela mentioned that her husband was deployed, the financial counselor alerted her that credit card companies must provide a lower interest rate to service members during a deployment. This would make a difference for sure. The financial counselor also consulted with the National Guard which was able to identify additional benefits and programs for Angela and her family, including case management and emergency financial assistance. In all, these programs helped reduce childcare costs and interest rates, and allowed Angela and her family to thrive during and after her husband’s deployment.

The financial counselor realized that he likely had other clients for whom some of these benefits and programs would be available, so decided to Ask the Question of them and all new clients.

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Select your profession to see how:

By asking “Have you or a family member ever served in the military?” senior services professionals can:

  1. Help older veterans feel understood and respected for their military service
  2. Make effective referrals to Veteran-specific programs and resources
  3. Help military widows access survivor benefits
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By asking “Have you or a family member ever served in the military?” children’s services professionals can:

  1. Help a student thrive when a parent is deployed
  2. Support families facing deployment and reintegration
  3. Improve peer sensitivity to military children
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By asking “Have you or a family member ever served in the military?” employment and vocational services professionals can:

  1. Identify a warrior’s transferable skills
  2. Connect Veterans to military-friendly employers
  3. Help a returning Service Member access veteran job training programs
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By asking “Have you or a family member ever served in the military?” faith-based professionals can:

  1. Identify families in need of extra help during deployment
  2. Motivate communities to come together on behalf of those who serve
  3. Connect military families to the supports and services they need
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By asking “Have you or a family member ever served in the military?” healthcare and medical professionals can:

  1. Build critical rapport with a reluctant patient
  2. Understand the relationship between military experiences and medical symptoms
  3. Provide effective referrals and resources
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By asking “Have you or a family member ever served in the military?” higher education professionals can:

  1. Help a warrior acclimate to a civilian learning environment
  2. Improve peer sensitivity to veteran classmates
  3. Effectively accommodate service-connected disabilities
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By asking “Have you or a family member ever served in the military?” housing services professionals can:

  1. Identify families that qualify for Veteran-specific housing programs
  2. Address service-related barriers to stable housing
  3. Provide effective referrals and resources
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By asking “Have you or a family member ever served in the military?” law enforcement professionals can:

  1. Keep veterans and their families safe
  2. Build trust and rapport in difficult situations
  3. Partner with providers who help Veterans in crisis
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By asking “Have you or a family member ever served in the military?” legal services professionals can:

  1. Support justice-involved veterans
  2. Identify legal challenges related to military service
  3. Link to effective resources
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By asking “Have you or a family member ever served in the military?” mental health professionals can:

  1. Build critical rapport with a reluctant client
  2. Understand the impact of military stressors on mental health and substance use
  3. Help a family understand the emotional effects of deployment on the whole family
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By asking “Have you or a family member ever served in the military?” social services professionals can:

  1. Engage reluctant Veteran clients
  2. Meet a military family’s unique needs
  3. Coordinate services between veteran and civilian providers
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By asking “Have you or a family member ever served in the military?” women’s services professionals can:

  1. Partner with veteran service providers in crisis situations
  2. Identify deployment-related triggers and risk factors
  3. Identify individuals affected by Military Sexual Trauma (MST)
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Call Us (844)-4ASKVET
Email Us AskTheQuestion@eastersealsnh.org